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Tony Rajanayagam
e.motion

TonyRajanayagam|Sri Lanka

Thank you, Lord, for the light of your presence which has made me truly alive.I praise You that your light far exceeds the glory of the flickering lights of this world. Your light within me outshines the brightness of the sun.


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My Dear Brothers & Sisters, in Christ Jesus !! I guess that, whiles we intercede in prayer for others. There comes a day when we have to call our own. So this is my personal call to you |mais

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Focus on God in Prayer

May 04, 2015

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Pray without ceasing.
—1 Thessalonians 5:17
 
You can guard against hypocrisy and ritualism in your prayer life by making God the focus of your prayers. This is what the apostle Paul was talking about when he said, “Pray without ceasing” (1 Thessalonians 5:17). Paul wasn’t talking about praying with your eyes closed all day long, walking around in a constant conversation with God. He was saying that there’s a way to pray in your spirit while going through the activities of your everyday life. We can live life on two different levels at the same time.
 
Years ago there was a man named Frank Laubach, who was the father of modern literacy programs today. He was also a devoted Christian who, in midlife, pledged that for the rest of his life, he would never to go more than one or two minutes without thinking about God. He developed some games and he called them the games of minutes. He wrote a book about it, about how to train yourself to go no more than two minutes without thinking about God and talking to God in prayer.
 
Here are some of Laubach’s suggestions.
 
First, in a social setting, whisper “God” or “Jesus” quietly as you glance at each person near you. Practice double vision as Jesus does; see the person as he is, but also see the person as Christ wants him to be.
 
Second, at mealtime, set an extra chair at the table to remind you of the presence of Christ.
 
Third, while reading a book or magazine, read it to Jesus. Realize that Jesus laughs with us at the fun, rejoices with us in the successes, and weeps with us in the tragedies.
 
Fourth, when problem-solving at work, instead of talking to yourself about the problem, develop a habit of talking to Jesus about it.
 
And finally, keep a picture of Christ, a cross, or a word from Scripture someplace where you will see it just as you’re going to sleep. Allow God to have the last word of the day. Then let your eyes and mind begin there in the morning.
Whisper to Him your every thought about washing and dressing in the morning; about cleaning your shoes and choosing your clothes.
Christ is interested in every trifle because He loves us more intimately than a mother loves her child.
 
Keep in mind, that’s the essence of what real prayer is. Prayer is not some theological formula to reach a distant deity who may or may not be there. Instead, prayer is an intimate conversation covering every detail of your life with the One who truly loves you the very most. Now that’s the kind of prayer that really works.